DISCUSS, SUPPORT, ACHIEVE!

 

PSN Home
Search PSN


  For New Parents

Newly Diagnosed
Reasons For Stroke
 
  Childhood Stroke

Child Stroke News
Research Groups
Research News
Research Studies
 
  After Effects

Cerebral Palsy
Epilepsy/Seizures
Hemiplegia
Hemiparesis
Hypotonia
Vision Issues
 
  Rehabilitation

Therapies
Equipment
Medical Supplies
Financial Issues
Transportation
 
  Support Information

Parent Support
Ask The Expert
Awareness
CJ's Playground
Scheduled Chats
Teen Survivors
Inspiration
In Loving Memory
 
  PSN Information

About PSN
Volunteer At PSN
Fundraising
Manage Subscription
Contact PSN
Site Credits
 
  Links To Other Sites

Link To PSN
Disability Support
Stroke - US
Stroke-International
Miscellaneous
Support Groups


 
 

 

What is Epilepsy?

 


 

ep•i•lep•sy

Pronunciation: (ep'u-lep"sE), [key]
n. Pathol.
a disorder of the nervous system, characterized either by mild, episodic loss of attention or sleepiness or by severe convulsions with loss of consciousness.

epilepsy, a chronic disorder of cerebral function characterized by periodic convulsive seizures. There are many conditions that have epileptic seizures. Sudden discharge of excess electrical activity, which can be either generalized (involving many areas of cells in the brain) or focal, also known as partial (involving one area of cells in the brain), initiates the epileptic seizure. Generalized seizures are classified as tonic-clonic (grand mal), in which there is loss of consciousness and involuntary contraction of all the muscles of the body, lasting a few minutes; or absence (petit mal), in which there is clouding of the consciousness for about 1 to 30 sec and no falling, with as many as 100 attacks occurring daily. Partial seizures include Jacksonian epilepsy, characterized by jerking in the hand and face on the side opposite the brain activity; and psychomotor seizures, in which there may be localized convulsion with no loss of consciousness, as well as incoherent speech and various involuntary movements of the body. Often these are accompanied by a warning cluster of signs and symptoms called an aura.

The cause is unknown in over half the cases of epilepsy, especially in those with onset under age 20. Predisposing factors in other cases include familial history, head injury, alcohol withdrawal, infections (such as meningitis), and abnormalities (such as tumors) of the brain.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

© Pediatric Stroke Network
All Rights Reserved.  Unauthorized use prohibited. 

The Pediatric Stroke Network copyright materials can not be copied in whole or in part by any person, organization or corporation other than PSN, it's divisions and units without the prior written permission of the Legal Department at the Pediatric Stroke Network. 

 Please read this DISCLAIMER before maneuvering this web site.

If you have questions or comments regarding this website, email the webmaster .